Some Answers

by Greg Tidwell

Jay;

I admire your persistence and appreciate the passion for understanding which drives you forward. You have been gracious and patient in approaching our areas of disagreement and I am honored to discuss these matters with you, with Todd and with Phil.

Jay writes:

We cannot progress in this discussion until you’ve answered these questions. We could talk about what the Bible says about inerrancy and baptism, but that would hardly provide a comprehensive understanding of the doctrine of apostasy. Those two doctrines raise issues that are quite different from, say, the role of women and instrumental music. However, if you no longer consider the role of women and instrumental music to be issues that place one in danger of divine judgment, we need not concern ourselves further with those issues in this apostasy discussion.

I have repeatedly resisted parsing error into acceptable and nonacceptable categories. To put forward that something is contrary to the will of God, but is acceptable, would not be a way I will proceed.

At this point in our discussion (not wanting to be obdurate) let me say that, yes indeed, I feel disregarding the authority of God’s Word concerning male spiritual leadership, and I feel embracing unauthorized worship places one in danger of divine judgment.

However, if we are not in agreement as to the Inspiration and Authority of Scripture (Inerrancy) and if we are not in agreement on God’s Way of Salvation (How One Is a Christian) then I cannot see the possibility of progress on the many other issues which trouble us.

Further, while my beliefs are a matter of public record, I see little value in this forum of composing a syllabus of my particular doctrinal convictions.

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6 Comments on “Some Answers”

  1. Alan Says:

    At this point in our discussion (not wanting to be obdurate) let me say that, yes indeed, I feel disregarding the authority of God’s Word concerning male spiritual leadership, and I feel embracing unauthorized worship places one in danger of divine judgment.

    Do you make a distinction between the person who correctly understands but disobeys, and the person who honestly misunderstands? If you make such a distinction, what is the condition of the honestly misguided person who never comes to a correct understanding in his own conscience? Is he ultimately lost?

  2. Ed Boggess Says:

    “What man knows the things of a man except the spirit of the man which is in him?” You ask for that which we cannot know! God knows those who are His. But God tells disciples to “test all things”. When one rejects Paul’s instructions on gender roles or adds to sing unauthorized accompaniment, whether he does so intentionally rejecting God’s authority or unintentionally, is irrelevant to my response. My response requires either: 1) acceptance as Christ accepts me if he does not demand corporate practice where such is believed unauthorized, or 2) non-acceptance if he creates discord by insisting a corporate practice that is not in harmony with the corporate belief. As for “is he ultimately lost?” – Since we cannot know the heart, it is best left to God.

  3. Alan Says:

    Ed, I agree. I’d like to hear whether Gregory agrees. And if so, I’d like to hear what the implications of that are for fellowship.

  4. Wayne McDaniel Says:

    Greg, Your phrase,”male spiritual leadership” is not
    of the scriptures. It seems designed to fabricate an idea that is not actually taught in the scriptures.

    I think the readers of this blog would be interested to read how you understand Paul in 1 Cor.11:5, where he refers women at Corinth both praying and prophesying. In 14:5, he is clear in his desire for ALL of the Corinthians to prophesy(speak for God).

    It is likely that many readers of this blog know the Greek word, gune, can be translated either wife or woman, and that affects how we understand 14:34-5.

    Instead of telling others that women cannot pray
    in the presence of men, all of us could reflect the humility of Jesus more clearly, if we would PRAY WITH OTHERS more, James 5:16, 1 Jn.5:16.


  5. Greg you stated,

    “Further, while my beliefs are a matter of public record, I see little value in this forum of composing a syllabus of my particular doctrinal convictions.”

    Your public statements are a sum total of who you are. If you are unwilling to stand behing them you have no core to build upon. Your beliefs are of utmost importance to this forum since you are one of the four participants. All of us realize that the positions one holds changes through the years as he grows and matures as a Christian. You are no exception. This doesn’t change the fact that you must either deny or hold to the values you have expoused through the years. Your core beliefs are central to your discussion in this venue.

  6. Ed Boggess Says:

    Every gospel preacher opposes error because God opposes error! He may list a series of “works of the flesh” and conclude that those who practice such will not be in the kingdom of God. Paul did. Could someone take Paul’s list and raise questions about this one or that one? Rejecting biblical authority is sinful regardless what element of God’s word is being rejected, whether the divinity of Christ or divinely ordained gender roles. What error can one hold without risk? Disciples seek truth, God’s truth, not what sub-par level can I get by with. Simon simply wanted in on what the apostles had; thought he could buy in – no big deal, right? Surely we can forbear with him, but Peter demanded repentance.
    “Yes but Rom 14 & 15”. Indeed. “Receive one another, just as Christ received us”. Christ receives us but he also expects us to continue to grow, mature, develop in our understanding of his will. Will the veggie-only eater be accepted by God after learning that all things are pure if he rejects this authority from God?


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